Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Iraq & Afghanistan 3D Training Simulation Wins National Modeling & Simulation Award

The University of Texas at Dallas, Arts & Technology (ATEC) Wins National Modeling and Simulation Award for a 3D Interactive Program: First Person Cultural Trainer.



ATEC's First Person Cultural Trainer (FPCT) is a real-time 3D serious game that provides soldiers with the necessary training on cultural issues and values in both Iraq and Afghanistan. One of the project sponsors for the game is the US Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC).

When playing the game the user must gain an understanding of social structures, values, and customs in different communities in order to navigate their way through the game and complete the four missions. In the past this kind of training was done using live actors and set creation, a costly and physically limiting solution. Using interactive 3D virtual gaming technology for non-entertainment purposes is affordable, easily distributable, and highly effective.

ATEC's FPCT has been featured at the Modeling & Simulation Leadership Summit and Interservice/Industry Training Simulation & Education Conference (I/ITSEC).

http://www.utdallas.edu/news/2010/2/23-1251_Game-Trains-Soldiers-in-a-Virtual-Iraq-or-Afghanis_article.html

1 comment:

finnscanblog said...

I am currently completing my Master's degree in Instructional Technology and learning about simulations. Looking at the description of the game, I am surprised that the army has in the past performed this training in real life. Building villages and hiring actors for this purpose seems like a lot of resources to invest in this training. However, I am glad that we can now offer ways for learning that will significantly decrease the cost of training. I had never thought about it, but providing simulations for the army actually helps the government with efficient management of tax dollars. Another benefit is that virtual training (vs. real life) offers a more systematic way of training, and decreases the level of variation. The training simulation looks very interesting, and I can only hope one day I will be able to design something like this.